Anti-Poverty Week runs from 15-21 October 2017

Summary of Anti Poverty Week in 2008

Activities during the Week

More than 350 activities were registered on our website for Anti-Poverty Week 2008 which was about 40% higher than in the previous year. This continued an unbroken sequence of major growth in each year since the Week began in 2002 with just four activities. Undoubtedly tehre were many other activities during the Week in 2008 of which we are unaware.

At least 500 organisations convened or sponsored an activity during Anti-Poverty Week 2008. They included welfare agencies, community centres, overseas aid organisations, religious groups, schools, TAFEs, universities, businesses, unions, hospitals, youth groups, housing organisations, media outlets, sporting groups, local councils and government departments. People from hundreds of other organisations attended at least one event.

Activities during the Week in 2008 included one or more of the following:

  • speech, lecture, oration, sermon, presentation, interview
  • meeting, forum, debate, hypothetical, resolution, seminar, conference, rally
  • training session, cooking class, information stall, display, expo
  • workshop, readings, school class, school project, teaching materials
  • report, survey, brochure, information pack, postcard, poster
  • religious service, festival, film night, exhibition, art show, fun day
  • walk, climb, drive, bus tour, parachute jump, stand up, football match, bowling
  • award, competition, concert, band, fair, fete, children's entertainent
  • barbecue, picnic, breakfast, tea, lunch, dinner, auction, trivia night, sleep-out 
  • meal service, night patrol, health check, food collection, donation, gift-making

Further details of activities are available at www.antipovertyweek.org.au.

Participants and venues

The number of activities is now too large to make reliable estimates of the total number of participants. However, it seems that hundreds of people spoke at activities and many more than ten thousand people participated in them. Participants included people from a very wide range of fields, including social welfare, religion, politics, health, education, housing, business, sport, the arts, economics, law and the media.

Activities were held in each State and Territory. About 40% took place in or near the centre of a capital city, 30% in an outer suburb and 30% in a regional city or country town. Venues for activities included

  • Parliament House, town hall, government office, council office
  • welfare agency, community centre, youth centre
  • hospital, health centre
  • cathedral, church, church hall
  • university, TAFE, school, library, gallery, museum 
  • concert hall, cinema, auditorium, theatre, arts centre, gallery
  • football ground, cricket ground, bowls club, leagues club
  • cafe, hotel, restaurant
  • shop, shopping centre, market, business office
  • street, mall, car park, square, bridge, footpath

Media References

We know of more than 300 media references to activities undertaken as part of the Week. About half of them were in radio or television outlets (of which about 50% were in commercial outlets and 15% were on television). The other half of the references were newspaper articles, of which about 30% were more than 500 words in length.

About 35% of electronic references and 60% of print references were in media outlets based in regional centres.

Coordination

The Week was loosely coordinated through a National Facilitating Group, with an honorary National Chair and a part-time National Coordinator and Project Coordinator, both based in Sydney. The National Patrol was Rev. Tim Costello and several States also had Patrons.

The State and Territory Co-Chairs were the heads or senior managers of

Anglicare (Tas); ACT Council of Social Service; Community Business Bureau (SA); Hanover Welfare Services (Vic); Holyoake (WA); Liquor, Hospitality, Miscellaneous Union (Tas); Marrickville Council (NSW); Melbourne Citymission; Mission Australia (Qld); Ngala (WA); NT Shelter; UnitingCare Centre for Social Justice (Qld); Volunteering SA; Volunteering NSW; Youth Coalation of ACT.

Resources

This year the effectiveness of the Week was greatly strengthened by the generous support of our two Principal National Sponsors:

                     jobs-australia                                                                      

Valuable assistance was also provided by our Key National Sponsors:

Australian Education Union
Mission Australia
Australian Nursing Federation
Catholic Social Services Australia
CARE Australia
Salvation Army
St Vincent de Paul
World Vision Australia
Liquor, Hospitality, Miscellaneous Workers Union
 

Total expenditure at the national level was approximately $55,000, about half of which was remuneration for the part-time National Coordinator and Project Coordinator. The remainder was expended mainly on printing, the website, media monitoring, travel, postage and office expenses. Crucial in-kind support was provided by UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide, which handled the Week's finances at the national level.

A number of the State Co-Chairs obtained assistance from donors for activities within their States as well as providing in-kind support from their own organisations. Most individual activities during the Week were funded by the respective organisers or by donations obtained directly by them.

Some cities, towns and suburbs in which activities were held during Anti-Poverty Week 2013

Adelaide
Brisbane
Canberra
Darwin
Hobart
Melbourne
Perth
Sydney
 
Albury
Aldinga
Andamooka
Atherton
Ballarat
Bendigo
Bulli
Brisbane Bunbury
Caboolture
Camden
Cairns
Christies Beach
 
 
 
 
Dayboro
Daylesford
Deception Bay
Edenhope
Elizabeth
Faulconbridge
Gawler
Hervey Bay
Horsham
Ipswich
Katherine
Korumburra
Launceston
Leongatha
Loxton
Mannum
Morambah
Mt Gambier
Murray Bridge
Noarlunga
Nowra
 
 
 
Palmerston
Parkes
Pt Pirie
Renmark
Scottsdale
Shepparton
Stawell
Toogoolawah
Traralgon
Waikerie
Whyalla
Wangaratta
Wodonga
Wollongong
Woy Woy