Anti-Poverty Week runs from 15-21 October 2017

Summary of Anti Poverty Week in 2013

Activities during the Week

More than 400 activities were organised for Anti-Poverty Week 2013. This is the fourth consecutive year in which the total has exceeded 400, having grown from just nine activities when the Week began in 2002.

More than 500 organisations convened or sponsored an activity during the Week. They included welfare agencies, community centres, overseas aid organisations, religious groups, schools, libraries, TAFEs, universities, businesses, service clubs, unions, disability organisations, youth groups, housing organisations, media outlets, sporting groups, local councils, financial institutions and government departments. People from hundreds of other organisations attended at least one event.

Activities during the Week in 2013 included one or more of the following:

  • congress, speech, lecture, oration, sermon, presentation, media interview
  • public rally, meeting, forum, debate, seminar, conference, discussion, soapbox
  • training session, cooking demonstration, information stall, display, trivia night
  • workshop, school project, report, book launch, survey, information kit, campaign
  • religious service, festival, film night, art competition, concert, fundraiser, auction
  • award, street soccer, bicycle ride, stair climbing, walkathon, flash mob, quiz,
  • barbecue, breakfast, tea, lunch, dinner, reception, children’s entertainment
  • meal service, toy drive, clothing drive, lamington drive, yard maintenance.

Major national publications were launched during the Week by Anglicare Australia; Australian Council of Social Service; The Benevolent Society; Edith Cowan University; National Rural Health Alliance; University of Canberra; UnitingCare; and St Vincent de Paul.

Further details of activities are available at www.antipovertyweek.org.au.

Participants and venues

The number of activities during the Week has become too large to make reliable estimates of the total number of participants. However, several hundred people spoke at activities and many thousands of people participated in them. Participants included people from a very wide range of fields, including social welfare, religion, politics, health, education, housing, business, sport, the arts, law and the media.

Prominent people who participated in the Week included former Governor General Sir William Deane as well as the Governor of Western Australia; Premier of Tasmania; Chief

Minister of the ACT; several State and Territory Ministers; Andrew Leigh, Sen Rachel Siewert and many other Federal and State parliamentarians; a number of Lord Mayors and Mayors; Cassandra Goldie, Ged Kearney, Julian Disney, Lisa Wilkinson, Rosemary Stanton and Poh Ling Yeow

Activities were held in each State and Territory. About 45% took place in or near the centre of a capital city, 35% in an outer suburb and 20% in a regional city or country town. Venues for activities included

  • Parliament House, town hall, government office, civic centre, bank
  • welfare agency, community centre, medical centre, youth centre
  • church, church hall, university, TAFE college, high school, primary school
  • theatre, cultural centre, library, gallery, bookshop, sports club
  • kitchen, cafĂ©, hotel, restaurant, store, shopping centre, railway station
  • mall, market, square, car park, esplanade, park, stairwell, garden

Media References

More than 150 articles relating to the Week were published in print or online, of which almost 50% were at least 500 words long. About 60% of the articles were in regional publications, with the remainder being in national or capital city publications.

About 200 items were broadcast on radio or TV outlets (excluding syndicated broadcasts) of which about 40% were on TV. About 30% of the items were longer than five minutes. About 35% were on regional, rather than national or metropolitan, outlets. More than 45% were on commercial, rather than public, broadcasters.

More than 1000 people followed APW on Twitter, and more than 2000 tweets mentioned the APW hashtags. The APW Facebook pages attracted about 1265 active users during the Week.

Coordination

The Week was loosely coordinated through a National Facilitating Group, with an honorary National Chair in Sydney and an honorary Deputy Chair in Adelaide. The part-time National Coordinator was based in Brisbane and the part-time National Liaison Officer in Sydney. Key organisational roles were played by Co-Chairs and Facilitating Groups in each State and Territory. These Co-Chairs were the heads or senior managers of the following organisations:

Anglicare WA; Australian Red Cross (NT); Australian Red Cross (Qld); Centacare Family Services (Tas) Good Shepherd Youth & Family Services (Vic); Mind Australia (Vic); Qld Council of Social Service; NT Shelter; Smith Family (WA); SA Council of Social Service; SA Local Government Association; St George Community Housing (NSW); St Vincent de Paul (ACT); St Vincent de Paul (NSW); Tasmanian Council of Social Service; YWCA Canberra (ACT).

Resources

This year the effectiveness of the Week was greatly strengthened by the generous support of our five Principal National Sponsors:

                     jobs-australia            Red Cross logo           745 BSL logo colr B                              

                                              thumb 6937 Anglicare LOGO RGB                    unsw logo

                                     

Valuable assistance was also provided by our Key National Sponsors:

Australian Education Union
CARE Australia
Australian Nursing and Midwifery               Federation
St Vincent de Paul
Salvation Army
Australian Services Union
United Voice

Crucial in-kind support for the Week was provided by UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide, which continued to handle the Week's finances at the national level.

A number of the State Co-Chairs obtained assistance from donors for activities within their States as well as providing in-kind support from their own organisations. Most individual activities during the Week were funded by the respective organisers or by donations obtained directly by them.

Some cities, towns and suburbs in which activities were held during Anti-Poverty Week 2013

Adelaide
Brisbane
Canberra
Darwin
Hobart
Melbourne
Perth
Sydney
Abbotsford
Aberfoyle Park
Albury
Alice Springs
Anula
Arncliffe
Ashfield)
Auburn
Baldivis
Bankstown
Barton
Baulkham Hills
Bayswater
Belconnen
Bentley
Berwick
Box Hill
Brompton
Bruce
Burnie
Burwood
Busselton
Cabramatta
Cairns
Camden
Campbelltown
Camperdown
Cannonvale
Chermside
Chidlow
Clearview
Collingwood
Condor
Corrimal
Craigieburn
Crawley
Cromer
Davoren Park
Deer Park
Devonport
Dulwich Hill
East Melbourne
Emerton
Enfield
Fairfield
Findon
Fitzroy
Floreat
Gawler
Geelong
Glenelg
Greenway
Griffith
Hawthorn East
Fairfield
Holt
Howrah
Hurstville
Inala
Ingleside
Invermay
Joondalup
Karratha
Kensington
Kingaroy
Kogarah
Kulin
Langford
Launceston
Leichhardt
Leongatha
Lewisham
Liverpool
Marion
Merrylands
Miller
Millers Point
Milton
Miranda
Mornington
Monto
Moonah
New Norfolk
New Town
Newstead
Newtown
North Parramatta
North Rocks
North Ryde
Nowra
Oaklands Park
Osbourne Park Palmerston
Parramatta
Perth
Phillip
Port Adelaide
Port Pirie
Preston
Punchbowl
Ringwood
Sanctuary Point
Sandy Bay
Seven Hills
Sherwood
Smithton
South Melbourne
South Wentworthville
Stanley
St ives
St Kilda
Strathfield
Subiaco
Summer Hill Sutherland
Surry Hills)
Sutherland
Swan View
Tamworth
Tarneit
Templestowe
Tennant Creek
Townsville
Ulladulla
Unley
Wangaratta
Warrawong
Watson
Werribee
West End
West Footscray
Westminster
White Hills
Woden
Wollongong
Woollahra
Woolloomooloo
Wynyard
Yankalilla